Great Shakes Alive!

I have Frankie Newman and her mother in my tree. Frankie married, not
William, but his son, Wilay Frank Newman. It has always been said
William married...tah dah...tthe Widow Newman! Below is the "story:"


The story as I heard it is that Frank Brister was coming over from
Ireland on a sailing ship. With him were his wife Lucinda Sullivan and his
father. According to one source, they had gone to Ireland to get
Lucinda, and the entire village she lived with. They were using money
Frank's father earned while fighting in the Texas Revolution.

Lucinda was pregnant, and delivered on the voyage. The baby was named
Mary, called Little Mary, supposedly after her mother, who Frank loved
with all his heart. Since we know her as Lucinda Sullivan, it is
possible her name was Lucinda Mary Sullivan, or Mary Lucinda Sullivan.
There is supposed to be a memorial to her in Misssissippi.

Baby Mary lived, but Lucinda died in the childbirth. The ships crew,
fearing sharks would attack the ship because of the dead body, wanted to
bury her at sea, as was the custom. However, Frank wouldn't allow it,
swearing she would receive a proper Christian burial on land. He stayed
awake and guarded her body with a shotgun (or a brace of pistols) until
landfall, days later. Women travelling with the men talked them into
allowing them to care for the baby until they reached port.

The group then proceeded down the Erie canal, then the Mississippi River
to Natchez, where the Brister family were in large number. There Frank
inquired about someone to care for the child while he went to Texas to
claim and settle the land granted him by his father, who received it as
partial payment for war service. He was told of Frankie Neuman, a
teenage girl living with her mother and uncles, who ran a general store.
Frankie's father had been a shoemaker with a shop across from the slave
market. He had been conscripted into the Confederate Army and never
heard from again. She agreed to look after the child, and Frank went on
to Texas.

After Frank claimed and cleared his land, he returned to Natchez to
retrieve his daughter. But in the months of his absence, young Frankie
had grown to love the child so much, she wouldn't let her go. So Frank
married Frankie and took her back to Texas.

The place where the couple settled was wild and isolated, miles from any
other settlers, surrounded by thick brush. Life was harsh. Frank was a
woodcutter, traveling many miles to work. One day the child was sick and
feverish, and Frankie was walking around outside the tent they occupied,
trying to comfort the crying child. She heard footfalls, turned, and
discovered another young woman standing near, dressed as herself in long
skirt and bonnet. She welcomed the visiter, having had little contact
with anyone besides her husband for many months. Frankie asked the young
woman if she had moved into the area recently, knowing no one lived
nearby, and that the path to where the nearest neighbors lived was long
and treacherous, over rough terrain. The woman replied that she lived
"very far away."

The visitor stroked the baby's cheek, and she seemed to quieten down.
She said to Frankie, "You sure love that baby, don't you?" to which
Frankie replied "I've had her since not long after her birth, and I love
her with all my heart like she was my very own."

After a while darkness was approaching, and the visitor rose to leave.
Frankie, carrying the baby, walked beside her up the path. She asked if
she could accompany her, so she'd be sure her new friend made it home
safely, and so she'd know where the other lived for future visits. The
young woman smiled and told Frankie "No, you can't go where I am going."
After they walked down the path a hundred yards or so, the pretty young
visitor turned to Frankie and said "You can go with me no further. But I
will remember what you have done for me, and will help you some day."
She then disappeared. Frankie rushed back to the tent, and when her
husband returned told him of the strang visit. They took a lantern and
retraced the two women's tracks down the path. At the point where
Frankie turned around, the second woman's footprints abruptly stopped.
The woman's description matched Lucinda's perfectly.

Years later, Frankie's youngest child, my greatgrandfather, lay in his
bed dying. My grandmother, a young girl at the time, sat with him, as
someone had to be with him always. Her mother worked in the kitchen,
preparing for the arrival of her mother-in-law, Frankie. My grandmother
looked up as a shadow crossed the window, and saw a woman dressed in
long skirts and a bonnet like her grandmother wore. She raced into the
kitchen and told her mother, "Granny's here!" Her mother replied that
that was impossible, that it was a long way her grandmother had to
travel, and that she hadn't had time to get there yet. But the girl
insisted, "I saw her on the porch looking in the window, it was her!"
Her mother took her outside and they searched, but no one could be found.

Later, when Grandma Frankie arrived, Ruby told her "I thought you came,
grandma, I saw you looking in the window." Her grandmother got a
peculier look on her face and described a woman. "Yes, that was her!"
Frankie smiled and sighed. "Seab will be o.k. now. She has come to help
him, and he will be fine." My Great grandfather started recovering that
very day and lived to be 95. Lucinda later visited my grandmother again,
when one of her own children was deathly ill. She is convinced to this
day that the spirit of Lucinda Hudson looks over the family that cared
for her only child.

I would love to trade info and figure this whole thing out. Finding this
site is a blessing!

Richard Shannon
Shannon - Rusling - Stoenstreet - Brister - Bell - West - Goldman -
Newman - McKnight - Reid - Caulk - Johnson
http://ccwf.cc.utexas.edu/~shannon1/

 

By the way, my greatgrandfather was Walter Seaborn BRISTER. His parents
were Frank and Frankie BRISTER. He was known as Seab, hated the name
Walter (Waller he called it), and lived to be 95, as did his wife,
Margaret Rozella Bell BRISTER. I am 45 yo and knew them all my life
until less than 10 years ago when they died.

- Richard

 

 

Marvin -

O.k. They moved there because William and Daniel were granted headrights
there for their service in the Revolution. They must have divided it up
among their sons. It seems what they did was come to Texas to stake out
land, fought in the Revolution, got their land and money went back to
Natchez. Gathered their sons and relatives together. Went to Ireland and
got wives for a number of men -- we do know there were a lot more men
than women on the frontier, and most women around were relatives -- and
came to Texas and founded a community. There was once a Bristerville
near Cambelltown near the ranch where the old Brister Cemetary is
located. There was even a Brister school. Among the people in the area
were the Goynes and the Goldmans. Both related by marriage.

- Rick

Got the following lookup from a San Antonio source:

I do find a William Brister, age 50, farmer, born in S.C. listed as family
169 on page 329/330 of the 1850 Bexar County census. He had living in his
family Maryan, 35, born in Miss.; William, 14, Born in Miss; Wiley F., 12;
George W. 10, Daniel J., 10, John C. 8, Yancy G., 6, James L. 3, & Martha
J., 4/12, all born in Texas

 

1860

70/64 Wm BRISTER. 61 m. Stockraiser. S. C; Mary, 50 f, Miss; Wm, 23 m, Stockraiser, Miss; W. F., 21 m, Stockraiser, Tex; G. W. BRISTER, 20 m, Stockraiser, Tex; Daniel, 20 m, Stockraiser, Tex; John C., 18 m, Stockraiser, Tex; Yancy G, 15 m, Stockraiser, Tex; Jas N (R), 12 m, Tex; Martha J, 10 f, Tex; Susan ,7 f, Tex.

 


Daniel Brister, age 45, a farmer born in Ky and family is listed as family
167 in the 1850 Bexar County census, page 330. No other Brister families
listed
It wasn't William, it was Wiley Frank. It's on the census and marriage
records for Atascosa Co. People alive today including my maternal
grandmother remember Frankie. Her grandparents were Frank and Frankie,
and she knew her grandmother well. Her father was Frankie's baby boy,
and she was a favorite daughter-in-law. The M. Brister was baby Mary.

There is evidence Frank was married three times. Once 10 years prior to
Frankie, seemingly without issue. Then he and his father went to
Ireland. I haven't seen documents, but the story is widespread in the
family. A number of Frank's brothers and cousins married Irish women,
and it seems the men had actually gone to Ireland for wives. Unknown how
many men made the journey, but have heard an entire village returned
with them. There is a 90+ yo woman in Gonzales, one of the Click or
Crick? sisters who remembers parts of the tale. Sometimes.

Any way, William Brister had married Sarah Jourdan in Mississippi. His
brother DDaniel married Clarissa Jourdan. They came to Texas. Frank
originally married a Jordan (Jourdan) 10 abot 1861. He married Frankie
in Atascosa County in 1871. In between, his first wife must have died,
as did William's, they went to Ireland for women for the Texas Brister
colony in Atascosa County. Frank's new bride, Lucinda Sullivan, died in
childbirth at sea (there are those who say baby Mary wasn't really
Frank's), the Bristers returned to Natchez, Mississippi, where the
Newmans were known to the Bristers.

This was post Civil War. The Widow Newman ran a general store with her
brothers and she and Frankie supposedly lived upstairs over the store.
We thought her name was Mary Ann or Marianne Newman, maiden name
unknown. It is said William eventually married the widow. Frank left the
baby with Frankie and went to Texas to survey his land and clear a
homesite. When he returned to Natchez to get the baby -- and probably
brothers, sisters-in-law, etc., Frankie wouldn't give up the child, so
Frank married her. She once told my greatgrandmother and grandmother,
when my grandmother was a girl, that she "never would have married that
old man if it wasn't for the baby."

Her father was a shoemaker who lived in Natchez. His business was across
the street from the slave market. The market was a square city block in
size in the center of town, and was surrounded by storefronts, saloons,
cafe's, warehousing and shipping business, and other businesses. A very
busy place. The story Frankie told was that she was a little girl and
the Confederate soldiers just showed up one day and took her father and
a bunch of other men away as conscripts. They never heard from him again.

Her mother moved eventually to Texas, to the Brister settlement, near
where the Brister Cemetary is now. that's where Frankie is buried, as is
Frank. Others, including the widow, I believe, are either there or on
the ranch just next door, outside the cemetary proper.

Some of the "less popular" daughters-in-law said Frankie was partial to
the Goldman grandchildren because they and she were Jewish. There have
been references to the Goldman family being Jewish before -- Saxon Jew,
the name Goldman had been seen on gold coins from Britain by the 1200s.
But no Goldman in my or my mothers' or my grandmothers' or my
greatgrandmothers' memory was Jewish. Ricahrd Goldman married baby Mary,
the infant born at sea. And all the related Goldmans and Bristers -- a
lot of them -- know the Frank and Frankie story.

As you can tell, I'm somewhat excited here. Making the Frankie
connection is a big thing to me. I've been looking.
<big SE grin>

Rick

Marvin wrote:
>
> That was a neat story
>
> It would be nice to link this up
>
> You mention Frank and Frankie moved to Texas
>
> Do you know where and When?
>
> There are some similarities to our family history. Elias, was a shoemaker
> and was not heard from after the War.
>
> Susan his widow moved to Texas and evidence suggest Frances (Frankie)
> married a Brister who was older than her.
>
> I have seen the Census records for the family and a child named M. Brister
> female was listed in the household.
>
> Maybe Frank was a nickname for William
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Richard Shannon <
rshannon@mail.utexas.edu>
> To:
jack@hal-pc.org <jack@hal-pc.org>
> Date: Sunday, January 17, 1999 10:45 PM
> Subject: Elias, Susan and Frances Newman
>
> >Great Shakes Alive!
> >
> >I have Frankie Newman and her mother in my tree. Frankie married, not
> >William, but his son, Wilay Frank Newman. It has always been said
> >William married...tah dah...tthe Widow Newman! Below is the "story:"
> >
> >
> >The story as I heard it is that Frank Brister was coming over from
> >Ireland on a sailing ship. With him were his wife Lucinda Sullivan and his
> >father. According to one source, they had gone to Ireland to get
> >Lucinda, and the entire village she lived with. They were using money
> >Frank's father earned while fighting in the Texas Revolution.
> >
> >Lucinda was pregnant, and delivered on the voyage. The baby was named
> >Mary, called Little Mary, supposedly after her mother, who Frank loved
> >with all his heart. Since we know her as Lucinda Sullivan, it is
> >possible her name was Lucinda Mary Sullivan, or Mary Lucinda Sullivan.
> >There is supposed to be a memorial to her in Misssissippi.
> >
> >Baby Mary lived, but Lucinda died in the childbirth. The ships crew,
> >fearing sharks would attack the ship because of the dead body, wanted to
> >bury her at sea, as was the custom. However, Frank wouldn't allow it,
> >swearing she would receive a proper Christian burial on land. He stayed
> >awake and guarded her body with a shotgun (or a brace of pistols) until
> >landfall, days later. Women travelling with the men talked them into
> >allowing them to care for the baby until they reached port.
> >
> >The group then proceeded down the Erie canal, then the Mississippi River
> >to Natchez, where the Brister family were in large number. There Frank
> >inquired about someone to care for the child while he went to Texas to
> >claim and settle the land granted him by his father, who received it as
> >partial payment for war service. He was told of Frankie Neuman, a
> >teenage girl living with her mother and uncles, who ran a general store.
> >Frankie's father had been a shoemaker with a shop across from the slave
> >market. He had been conscripted into the Confederate Army and never
> >heard from again. She agreed to look after the child, and Frank went on
> >to Texas.
> >
> >After Frank claimed and cleared his land, he returned to Natchez to
> >retrieve his daughter. But in the months of his absence, young Frankie
> >had grown to love the child so much, she wouldn't let her go. So Frank
> >married Frankie and took her back to Texas.
> >
> >The place where the couple settled was wild and isolated, miles from any
> >other settlers, surrounded by thick brush. Life was harsh. Frank was a
> >woodcutter, traveling many miles to work. One day the child was sick and
> >feverish, and Frankie was walking around outside the tent they occupied,
> >trying to comfort the crying child. She heard footfalls, turned, and
> >discovered another young woman standing near, dressed as herself in long
> >skirt and bonnet. She welcomed the visiter, having had little contact
> >with anyone besides her husband for many months. Frankie asked the young
> >woman if she had moved into the area recently, knowing no one lived
> >nearby, and that the path to where the nearest neighbors lived was long
> >and treacherous, over rough terrain. The woman replied that she lived
> >"very far away."
> >
> >The visitor stroked the baby's cheek, and she seemed to quieten down.
> >She said to Frankie, "You sure love that baby, don't you?" to which
> >Frankie replied "I've had her since not long after her birth, and I love
> >her with all my heart like she was my very own."
> >
> >After a while darkness was approaching, and the visitor rose to leave.
> >Frankie, carrying the baby, walked beside her up the path. She asked if
> >she could accompany her, so she'd be sure her new friend made it home
> >safely, and so she'd know where the other lived for future visits. The
> >young woman smiled and told Frankie "No, you can't go where I am going."
> >After they walked down the path a hundred yards or so, the pretty young
> >visitor turned to Frankie and said "You can go with me no further. But I
> >will remember what you have done for me, and will help you some day."
> >She then disappeared. Frankie rushed back to the tent, and when her
> >husband returned told him of the strang visit. They took a lantern and
> >retraced the two women's tracks down the path. At the point where
> >Frankie turned around, the second woman's footprints abruptly stopped.
> >The woman's description matched Lucinda's perfectly.
> >
> >Years later, Frankie's youngest child, my greatgrandfather, lay in his
> >bed dying. My grandmother, a young girl at the time, sat with him, as
> >someone had to be with him always. Her mother worked in the kitchen,
> >preparing for the arrival of her mother-in-law, Frankie. My grandmother
> >looked up as a shadow crossed the window, and saw a woman dressed in
> >long skirts and a bonnet like her grandmother wore. She raced into the
> >kitchen and told her mother, "Granny's here!" Her mother replied that
> >that was impossible, that it was a long way her grandmother had to
> >travel, and that she hadn't had time to get there yet. But the girl
> >insisted, "I saw her on the porch looking in the window, it was her!"
> >Her mother took her outside and they searched, but no one could be found.
> >
> >Later, when Grandma Frankie arrived, Ruby told her "I thought you came,
> >grandma, I saw you looking in the window." Her grandmother got a
> >peculier look on her face and described a woman. "Yes, that was her!"
> >Frankie smiled and sighed. "Seab will be o.k. now. She has come to help
> >him, and he will be fine." My Great grandfather started recovering that
> >very day and lived to be 95. Lucinda later visited my grandmother again,
> >when one of her own children was deathly ill. She is convinced to this
> >day that the spirit of Lucinda Hudson looks over the family that cared
> >for her only child.
> >
> >I would love to trade info and figure this whole thing out. Finding this
> >site is a blessing!
> >
> >Richard Shannon
> >Shannon - Rusling - Stoenstreet - Brister - Bell - West - Goldman -
> >Newman - McKnight - Reid - Caulk - Johnson
> >
http://ccwf.cc.utexas.edu/~shannon1/
> >


 

If you would like a copy of the census record, you should contact the
registrar of the San Antonio Genealogical and Historical Society at
saghs@aisi.net. Volunteers for the society do limited research at a cost
of $7 an hour plus copy and mailing costs.
Janey E. Joyce in San Antonio, Texas

+++++++++++++++

Marvin wrote:
>
> So your great grandfather was named after my Great Grandfather
>
> Seborn Newman
>
> I think this is a connection
>
> 1880 Census Soundex identifies a W. F. Brister age 48 born Texas
> Frances
> 28 Miss
> MAEL (d)
> 16 Tx
> W. E. (s)
> 8 Tx
> JA (s)
> 6 Tx
> MI or J (d)
> 2 Tx
> DA Brister B/L
> 13 Louisana
>
> The census records for Atascosa County are in very poor shape.
>
> Several Brister s in the County were land owners. a W F Brister is recorded
> as owning 183 acres in 1871 in Atascosa County. W F Brister, 48, is
> according to the 1880 census records married to a Frances, age 28. They have
> 5 children. The age of Frances appears correct to be Elias' daughter.
> There are other Newmans, Nolan and Nolen family s identified in various
> records in the county. Why the family moved to Atascosa County at this time
> is still a mystery.
>
> Nolen was Frankie's mother's maiden name
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Richard Shannon <
rshannon@mail.utexas.edu>
> To:
jack@hal-pc.org <jack@hal-pc.org>
> Date: Sunday, January 17, 1999 10:45 PM
> Subject: Elias, Susan and Frances Newman
>
> >Great Shakes Alive!
> >
> >I have Frankie Newman and her mother in my tree. Frankie married, not
> >William, but his son, Wilay Frank Newman. It has always been said
> >William married...tah dah...tthe Widow Newman! Below is the "story:"
> >
> >
> >The story as I heard it is that Frank Brister was coming over from
> >Ireland on a sailing ship. With him were his wife Lucinda Sullivan and his
> >father. According to one source, they had gone to Ireland to get
> >Lucinda, and the entire village she lived with. They were using money
> >Frank's father earned while fighting in the Texas Revolution.
> >
> >Lucinda was pregnant, and delivered on the voyage. The baby was named
> >Mary, called Little Mary, supposedly after her mother, who Frank loved
> >with all his heart. Since we know her as Lucinda Sullivan, it is
> >possible her name was Lucinda Mary Sullivan, or Mary Lucinda Sullivan.
> >There is supposed to be a memorial to her in Misssissippi.
> >
> >Baby Mary lived, but Lucinda died in the childbirth. The ships crew,
> >fearing sharks would attack the ship because of the dead body, wanted to
> >bury her at sea, as was the custom. However, Frank wouldn't allow it,
> >swearing she would receive a proper Christian burial on land. He stayed
> >awake and guarded her body with a shotgun (or a brace of pistols) until
> >landfall, days later. Women travelling with the men talked them into
> >allowing them to care for the baby until they reached port.
> >
> >The group then proceeded down the Erie canal, then the Mississippi River
> >to Natchez, where the Brister family were in large number. There Frank
> >inquired about someone to care for the child while he went to Texas to
> >claim and settle the land granted him by his father, who received it as
> >partial payment for war service. He was told of Frankie Neuman, a
> >teenage girl living with her mother and uncles, who ran a general store.
> >Frankie's father had been a shoemaker with a shop across from the slave
> >market. He had been conscripted into the Confederate Army and never
> >heard from again. She agreed to look after the child, and Frank went on
> >to Texas.
> >
> >After Frank claimed and cleared his land, he returned to Natchez to
> >retrieve his daughter. But in the months of his absence, young Frankie
> >had grown to love the child so much, she wouldn't let her go. So Frank
> >married Frankie and took her back to Texas.
> >
> >The place where the couple settled was wild and isolated, miles from any
> >other settlers, surrounded by thick brush. Life was harsh. Frank was a
> >woodcutter, traveling many miles to work. One day the child was sick and
> >feverish, and Frankie was walking around outside the tent they occupied,
> >trying to comfort the crying child. She heard footfalls, turned, and
> >discovered another young woman standing near, dressed as herself in long
> >skirt and bonnet. She welcomed the visiter, having had little contact
> >with anyone besides her husband for many months. Frankie asked the young
> >woman if she had moved into the area recently, knowing no one lived
> >nearby, and that the path to where the nearest neighbors lived was long
> >and treacherous, over rough terrain. The woman replied that she lived
> >"very far away."
> >
> >The visitor stroked the baby's cheek, and she seemed to quieten down.
> >She said to Frankie, "You sure love that baby, don't you?" to which
> >Frankie replied "I've had her since not long after her birth, and I love
> >her with all my heart like she was my very own."
> >
> >After a while darkness was approaching, and the visitor rose to leave.
> >Frankie, carrying the baby, walked beside her up the path. She asked if
> >she could accompany her, so she'd be sure her new friend made it home
> >safely, and so she'd know where the other lived for future visits. The
> >young woman smiled and told Frankie "No, you can't go where I am going."
> >After they walked down the path a hundred yards or so, the pretty young
> >visitor turned to Frankie and said "You can go with me no further. But I
> >will remember what you have done for me, and will help you some day."
> >She then disappeared. Frankie rushed back to the tent, and when her
> >husband returned told him of the strang visit. They took a lantern and
> >retraced the two women's tracks down the path. At the point where
> >Frankie turned around, the second woman's footprints abruptly stopped.
> >The woman's description matched Lucinda's perfectly.
> >
> >Years later, Frankie's youngest child, my greatgrandfather, lay in his
> >bed dying. My grandmother, a young girl at the time, sat with him, as
> >someone had to be with him always. Her mother worked in the kitchen,
> >preparing for the arrival of her mother-in-law, Frankie. My grandmother
> >looked up as a shadow crossed the window, and saw a woman dressed in
> >long skirts and a bonnet like her grandmother wore. She raced into the
> >kitchen and told her mother, "Granny's here!" Her mother replied that
> >that was impossible, that it was a long way her grandmother had to
> >travel, and that she hadn't had time to get there yet. But the girl
> >insisted, "I saw her on the porch looking in the window, it was her!"
> >Her mother took her outside and they searched, but no one could be found.
> >
> >Later, when Grandma Frankie arrived, Ruby told her "I thought you came,
> >grandma, I saw you looking in the window." Her grandmother got a
> >peculier look on her face and described a woman. "Yes, that was her!"
> >Frankie smiled and sighed. "Seab will be o.k. now. She has come to help
> >him, and he will be fine." My Great grandfather started recovering that
> >very day and lived to be 95. Lucinda later visited my grandmother again,
> >when one of her own children was deathly ill. She is convinced to this
> >day that the spirit of Lucinda Hudson looks over the family that cared
> >for her only child.
> >
> >I would love to trade info and figure this whole thing out. Finding this
> >site is a blessing!
> >
> >Richard Shannon
> >Shannon - Rusling - Stoenstreet - Brister - Bell - West - Goldman -
> >Newman - McKnight - Reid - Caulk - Johnson
> >
http://ccwf.cc.utexas.edu/~shannon1/
> >

 

 

Marvin -

Wiley Frank Brister. I don't know William's middle name. Could also have
been Frank. He also had a son named William. But it was William's son
Wiley Frank who married Frankie. They are buried together inthe Brister
Cemetary, I believe. Anyway, census and other records show William had a
son named Wiley F. Brister who married Frankie Newman. My grandma always
said her grandparents were Frank and Frankie and Marion and Mary.

Here are some zipped scans from Katerine Morgan. Two are a list of
people buried at the Brister Cemetary, one is a list of Atascosa Co. marriages.

- Rick

Marvin wrote:
>
> William F. Brister
> Hey I have him as William F. Brtister!!!
> F. for Frank possible???!!!
> >By the way, my greatgrandfather was Walter Seaborn BRISTER. His parents
> >were Frank and Frankie BRISTER.


The following is from Brister researcher Katherine Gail Morgan:
+++++

1. WILLIAM1 BRISTER (THOMPSONA BRISTOW, JEDIDIAHB, JOHNC, ROBERT JR.D,
ROBERT SR.E) was born July 1774 in Virginia. He married SUSANNAH.

Children of WILLIAM BRISTER and SUSANNAH are:
i. MARY2 BRISTER, m. JOHN NOLAN, 05 January 1830, Lawrence Co., MS.

Notes for JOHN NOLAN:
John Nowlen

ii. JEDIAH BRISTER, b. Abt. 1795, S.C.; m. SUSANNAH BRISTER, 20 October
1819, Lawrence Cty., MS.
2. iii. WILLIAM BRISTER, b. 1799, Greenville, SOUTH CAROLINA/Kentucky;
d. WFT Est. 1854-1891, Texas.
3. iv. DANIEL BRISTER, b. 16 March 1801, kentucky; d. 08 February 1891,
buried on Brister land at the old place.
4. v. MARTHA BRISTER, b. 1804, Kentucky; d. Unknown, Buried Gussettville Cemetery.
vi. ELIZABETH BRISTER, b. 07 December 1810, S.C.; m. GEORGE WILSON
EFFERSON, 30 December 1825, Lawrence Co., MS.
vii. ZEDEKIAH BRISTER, b. Unknown; d. Unknown; m. SUSANNAH BUSBY, 02
May 1819, Lawrence Co. Mississipp.

Notes for ZEDEKIAH BRISTER:
Was administer for his father William's estate in Lawrence Co., Mississippi



Generation No. 2

2. WILLIAM2 BRISTER (WILLIAM1, THOMPSONA BRISTOW, JEDIDIAHB, JOHNC,
ROBERT JR.D, ROBERT SR.E) was born 1799 in Greenville, SOUTH
CAROLINA/Kentucky, and died WFT Est. 1854-1891 in Texas. He married (1)
SARAH JOURDAN 24 February 1821 in Lawrence Co. Mississippi. He married
(2) MARYAN (NEUMAN) 1836 in Mississippi.

Notes for WILLIAM BRISTER:
William & Daniel received land grants after the war.

No. 418 IN THE NAME OF THE (SEAL) REPUBLIC
OF TEXAS Vol. 1

T0 ALL TO WHOM THESE, PRESENTS SHALL COME, KNOW YE, I,
Anson Jones, president of the Republic aforesaid, by virtue of the power
vested in me by law and in accordance with the Statutes of said
Republic, in such case made and provided, do by these presents Grant to
William Brister, his heirs or assigns Forever, Twelve Hundred and Eighty
acres of land, situated and described as follows:
In Bexar County, known as Survey No. 186, in Section
no. 6, on Lipan Creek a branch of Atascosa, a branch of the Rio Frio;
Beginning at a stake for the South East corner of Survey No. 185, and
South West corner of this Survey from which a mesquite 6 inches in
diameter bears South 40* East 26 varas, and another mesquite 8 inches in
diameter bears North 14 1/2* East 26 varas, Thence North 40* West 2350
varas a branch, two thousand six hundred and eighty seven varas the
North West corner stake on the North East boundary of survey No. 185
from which a mesquite 20 inches in diameter bears South 71* West 9 1/2
varas, and a mesquite 7 inches in diameter bears South 59* West 5 1/2
varas. Thence North 50* East two thousand six hundred and eighty seven
varas the North East corner a stake from which a mesquite 12 inches in
diameter bears South 34 1/2* West 9 varas and a mesquite 6 in- ches in
diameter bears South 77* East 13 varas. Thense South 40* East Two
thousand six hundred and eighty seven varas the South East corner on the
North West boundary of Survey No. 147, a stake and mound. Thence South
50* West2600 varas to a creek two thousand, six hundred and eighty
seven varas to the beginning. Bearing trees marked -

-

-

x

Hereby relinquishing to him the said William Brister,
and his heirs or assigns Forever, all the right and title in and to said
Land, heretofore held and possessed by the Government of said Republic,
and I do hereby issue this Letter patent for the same.
IN TESTIMONY Whereof I have caused the Great Seal of
the Republic to be affixed, as well
as the Seal of the General Land Office.
Done at the City of Austin, on the Fifteenth day of
August, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Forty Five and the year of the
Independence of said Republic the Tenth.
Thos. Wm. Ward, Commissioner Anson
Jones, President.
GENERAL LAND OFFICE
AUSTIN, TEXAS, October 4th. 1919.

I, J. T. Robison, Commissioner of the General Land
Office of the State of Texas, hereby certify that the foregoing is a
true and correct copy from the Record kept in this Office. In testimony
whereof I here unto set my hand and affix the impress of the seal of
said office the date last above written.

J.T. Robison,
(SEAL)
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

Filed for record Oct. 6th. 1919 at 3 o'clock P.M. and duly recorded Oct.
8th. 1919 at 4:30 o'clock P.M. in Vol. 79. on pages 442 and 443, Deed
Records of Atascosa County, Texas.


L. MORGAN WILLIAMS,
(SEAL)
Clerk County Court, Atascosa County, Texas.

By, Rio Lewis _________Deputy.

William& Mary Ann Brister's graves are the last two tombs at the Brister Cemetery.

Willam Brister married Mary Ann Neumann (the widow Neumann) after the
Civil War. His son married Mary Ann's daughter Frankie in Natchez Mississippi.


(STORY TOLD BY RICHARD SHANNON)
Story is William fought in the Texas Revolution, then he and Frank went
to Ireland and brought back an entire village, that included the love of
Frank's life, Lucinda Sullivan. Lucinda died at sea during childbirth.
When they got to Natchez, Frank hired Frankie Neumann to watch the child
while he and his father went to a woodcutters camp to work. When they
returned several weeks (or months) later, Frankie wouldn't relinquish
the child, so Frank married her. They had numerous children and moved
"back" to Texas.


The first settlers in the vicinity of El Tordillo were the brothers Dan
and William Brister. They moved there in 1854, from a place they had
settled in 1874 on the Cibolo, just above the mouth of the Martinez
driven to the move, old Dan said, because the Cibolo country had got so
full of people that he didn't have elbow room. Soon after the arrivals
of the Brister, Indians came along and drove off quite a number of their
horses. Whether the animals were recovered is not remembered.

Notes for SARAH JOURDAN:
Sarah Jourdan

Children of WILLIAM BRISTER and MARYAN (NEUMAN) are:
5. i. WILLIAM JASPER3 BRISTER, b. 14 February 1836, Mississippi; d. 15
January 1908, Streeter, Mason County, Texas Buried Honet Creek Cemetery.
6. ii. WILEY FRANK BRISTER, b. 11 May 1838, TEXAS; d. 13 April 1913,
Buried in Brister Cemetery.
iii. DANIEL JASPER BRISTER, b. 19 August 1839, Texas; d. 1882, Buried
in Gussettville, beside the Old St. Joseph's Catholic Church; m. (1)
SARA SALLEY GOYNES, 1870; m. (2) MARGARET FRANCES MCMURRAY, 28 July
1873, Live Oak Co. Texas.

Notes for DANIEL JASPER BRISTER:
Near I H 35 (about a mile north of Goynes Junction )... On the west side
of I H. 35 ))> Margaret Frances McMurray, Her father and Wiley W. Goynes
is also Buried there (and Sister Susan Goynes Tindol, Bolgiano,
Dickerson) Martha Brister,Goynes married to Wiley Williamson Goynes is
also buried there.
Daniel Jasper was accused of the murder of M.L. Peavey on 30 June 1869
and was acquitted on June 26, 1872.




7. iv. GEORGE WASHINGTON BRISTER, b. 19 August 1839; d. Unknown.
v. JOHN C. BRISTER, b. 1842, Texas.
8. vi. YANCEY GOODALL BRISTER, b. 07 December 1844, Texas; d. 07 October
1917, Buried in Brister Cemetery.
vii. JAMES LARKIN BRISTER, b. 1847; m. SARAH ELLEN "ELLA" BOLGIANO, 08
September 1867, Atascosa Co. Texas.
9. viii. MARTHA J. BRISTER, b. 1849.
10. ix. SUSANNAH SMARTIE BRISTER, b. 1852.

3. DANIEL2 BRISTER (WILLIAM1, THOMPSONA BRISTOW, JEDIDIAHB, JOHNC,
ROBERT JR.D, ROBERT SR.E) was born 16 March 1801 in kentucky, and died
08 February 1891 in buried on Brister land at the old place. He married
CLARRISAY JORDAN 29 October 1831 in Lawrence Co. Mississippi.

Notes for DANIEL BRISTER:
William & Daniel received land grants after the war.

No. 417 IN THE NAME OF THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS
VOL 1

To all to whom these presents shall come, know ye,
I Anson Jones, President of the Republic aforesaid, by
virture of the power vested in me by law and in accordance with the
Statutes of said Republic in such case made and provided, do by these
presents grant to Daniel Brister his heirs or assigns forever, Twelve
hundred and eighty acres of land, situated and described as follows; In
Bexar County, known as Survey No. 190 in Section No. 6 on a branch of
Lipan Creek a branch of Laha, a branch of Atascosa a branch of the Rio
Frio. Beginning at a stake for the North corner of Survey No. 186 and
West corner of this Survey, from which a mesquite 12 inches in diameter
bears South 341/2* West 9 varas and another mesquite 6 inches in
diameter bears South 77* East 13 varas; Thence North 50* East two
thousand six hundred and eighty seven Vars the North corner a stake from
which a mesquite 9 inches in diameter bears South 47 3/4* East 18 varas
and a mesquite 10 inches in diameter bears North 7 3/4* East 39 varas.
Thence South 40* East 787 varas the West Corner of Survey No. 132.
Thence South 39 3/4* East nineteen Hundred varas with the South West
boundary of Survey No. 132 to its South corner and East corner of this
Survey, a stake from which a Live Oak 8 inches in diameter bears North
15* East 8 varas and a mesquite 8 inches in diameter bears South 29*
West 16 varas. Thence South 50* West 1713 varas to a creek 2487 varas,
The West corner of Survey No. 148, two thousand six hundred and eighty
seven varas, the East corner of No. 186 and South corner of this Survey,
a stake and mound. Thence North 40* West two thousand six hundred and
eighty seven varas to the place of beginning, all the bearing trees
marked -

-

-

x
Hereby relinquishing to him the said Daniel Brister and his heirs
or assigns forever, all the right and title in and said Land, heretofore
held and possessed by the Government of said Republic and I do hereby
issue this Letter Patent for the same.
In testimony whereof, I have caused the Great Seal of the Republic
to be affixed, as well as the Seal of the General Land Office.
Done at the City of Austin on the Fifteen day of August One
Thousand Eight Hundred and Forty five and the year of the Independence
of said Republic the tenth.

Anson Jones, President.
Thos. Wm. Ward, Commissioner.

General Land Office, Austin Texas, Texas, May 23rd 1916.
I J.T. Robison Commissioner of the General Land Office of the State of
Texas hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct copy from
the Record kept in this office.

(Seal)
J.T. Robison Commissioner General Land Office.
Filed for record June 21" 1916 at 9 o'clock A. M. and recorded June 23"
1916 at 3 o'clock P.M.
in Deed Records, Atascosa County, Vol. 65, page 378-379


L. Morgan Williams,
(Seal)
Clerk C.C. Atascosa County, Texas.

By__E.G. Dossey________Deputy.
o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-




A VAQUERO OF THE BRUSH COUNTRY By: J. Frank Dobie

Now, ten men are a small crew to handle a herd of 4500 cattle,
especially when the cattle are hungry, thirsty, and feverish from having
been ginned about, especially also when the men have been in the saddle
almost constantly for sixty hours. Fortunately, they had brought plenty
of horses. They managed to get the cattle to the Lipan Creek by dark,
camping near Dan Brister's Ranch.
That night word came in that another herd of cattle fresh from
ranges to the east was over on Atascosa Creek to the south. In the
morning Bill Butler took four men with him, leaving five to ride around
the 4500 cattle. Towards the close of the day he returned with 1200
head that he had cut out of this second herd.
The men had now been in the saddle for three days and most of three
nights. They had not had time to cook anything to eat, but had merely
"snacked" off cold biscuits and meat that they had brought along in
morrals. That morning before leaving the camp at the Brister's ranch,
however, Butler had detailed A.M. Nichols, sixteen years old at the time
to butcher a cow and cook her. Nichols had borrowed an axe and a spade
from Brister, had dug a trench, made a fire in it, and then built over
it a scaffold of green poles. The meat of the cow had barbecued all day
over the coals, and Mrs. Brister had cooked up a washtub full of
biscuits. Also in borrowed utensils young Nichols had made five gallons
of coffee. The cowmen from Goliad and Bee counties were hourly
expected. At dusk they dashed in.

Children of DANIEL BRISTER and CLARRISAY JORDAN are:
i. WILLIAM M.3 BRISTER, b. 1836, Mississippi; d. Unknown.
ii. SUSAN C. BRISTER, b. 05 January 1840, Texas; d. 17 March 1925,
Buried in Brister Cemetery; m. CHARLES WALSMITH, 07 January 1880,
Atascosa Co. Texas.
iii. REASON BRISTER, b. 1844, Texas.
11. iv. DANIEL "DUDE" FRANKLIN BRISTER, b. December 1846, Texas; d.
1918, Buried in Brister Cemetery.
v. TABATHA BRISTER, b. 1848, Texas; m. GILES M. HIME, 27 January 1887,
Atascosa Co. Texas.
12. vi. SAM E. BRISTER, b. 1851, Texas.

4. MARTHA2 BRISTER (WILLIAM1, THOMPSONA BRISTOW, JEDIDIAHB, JOHNC,
ROBERT JR.D, ROBERT SR.E) was born 1804 in Kentucky, and died Unknown in
Buried Gussettville Cemetery. She married WILEY WILLIAMSON SR. GOYNES
09 May 1822 in Lawrence Co. Mississippi, son of JAMES GOYNES.

Notes for MARTHA BRISTER:
Near I H 35 about a mile north of Goynes Junction on the West side of
I H 35
Gussettvill Cemetery beside the Old St. Joseph's Catholic Church.
is where Wiley & Martha are buried.

The Cadiz baptist Church, first known as Lapara Baptist Church, was
organized on Aug 12 , 1877, under a tree on land that now belongs J.H.
Coward. Elders A.H. Barber, John East and James Scarborough assisted in
the organization. The minutes of that organization show the following
members coming by letter: Bro. George Barber, Bro. J.M. Davis, Elder
John East, Sister Martha Goynes, Sister C.F. Johnson, Sister Elizabeth
Collier, Sister Susan Dickerson, Bro. C.B. Ferrell, Bro. Edward Hinnen.
Bro. West Collier and Sister Susan Davis came by restoration. The
same record shows the following members came by baptism: Sister M.D.
Barber, Sister S.E. Brister, Sister Dollie Dickerson, Sister Michel
Ferrell, Bro. Armey Judd, Bro. John Price, Bro. Edwin Sisson, Bro. G.W.
Tindol Sister Susan Tindol, Sister M.J. Turner, Bro. Mark Judd, Sister
J.F. Brister, Bro. Buck Cheak, Sister F.A. Ferrell, Bro. W.M. Jenkins,
Sister Julia Judd, Sister Sarah Lee, Sister Laura Price, Sister Virginia
Sisson, Bro. George Turner, Sister N.C. Turner.
These pioneer members of the church believed in Christians living
exemplary lives as they understood the meaning; and when a brother or
sister erred, a committee would visit the sinner and plead with him to
repent and ask forgiveness and restoration to fellowship in the church.
If this council was unheeded, the erring one would be excluded from
fellowship of the church for an act of misconduct ranging from dancing
or drunkenness to adultery. The church ceased this practice many years ago.

Notes for WILEY WILLIAMSON SR. GOYNES:

Wiley Williamson Goynes filed a will in Live Oak Co. in 1877.


Children of MARTHA BRISTER and WILEY GOYNES are:
13. i. SUSAN3 GOYNES, b. 02 February 1825, Lawrence Co. Mississippi; d.
1925, Buried in Goynes Cemetery..
14. ii. WILLIAM M BILL GOYNES, b. 1829; d. 15 February 1902.
iii. DANIEL F. GOYNES, b. 1831, Mississippi; d. January 1863, killed in
battle of gettsburg during the Civil War.
iv. JAMES B. GOYNES, b. 1837, Mississippi; d. 1864, killed in
Cambelton , Texas By: Mitchell L. Peavey.
v. WILEY WILLIAMSON GOYNES II, b. 1839, Mississippi; d. 11 May 1864,
Killed in battle of Gettisburg in Civil War.
15. vi. A.S. AUGUSTUS SANDERS GOYNES, b. 30 June 1840, DeKalb, Kemper
Co. Mississippi; d. 30 June 1892, killed Van Horn El Paso, Texas.
vii. SARA SALLEY GOYNES, b. 1849, Mississippi; d. Live Oak County
Texas; m. DANIEL JASPER BRISTER, 1870.

Notes for DANIEL JASPER BRISTER:
Near I H 35 (about a mile north of Goynes Junction )... On the west side
of I H. 35 ))> Margaret Frances McMurray, Her father and Wiley W. Goynes
is also Buried there (and Sister Susan Goynes Tindol, Bolgiano,
Dickerson) Martha Brister,Goynes married to Wiley Williamson Goynes is
also buried there.
Daniel Jasper was accused of the murder of M.L. Peavey on 30 June 1869
and was acquitted on June 26, 1872.




viii. DAVID GOYNES, b. Unknown; d. Killed in PowderHorn , Texas on
Joe Collins Ranch.


Generation No. 3

5. WILLIAM JASPER3 BRISTER (WILLIAM2, WILLIAM1, THOMPSONA BRISTOW,
JEDIDIAHB, JOHNC, ROBERT JR.D, ROBERT SR.E) was born 14 February 1836 in
Mississippi, and died 15 January 1908 in Streeter, Mason County, Texas
Buried Honet Creek Cemetery. He married ELIZABETH 1865.

Children of WILLIAM BRISTER and ELIZABETH are:
i. CANDIS4 BRISTER, b. 1866.
ii. WILLIAM THOMAS BRISTER, b. 02 August 1868, Mason,Texas; d. 02
October 1918, Fort Worth, Texas Buried Oakalla, Texas; m. MARTHA JANE
"MATTIE" MORGAN, 1896, Texas.
iii. MALINDA E. BRISTER, b. 1872.
iv. QUEEN VICTORIA BRISTER, b. 1874; m. JOHN HAYWOOD BROADWAY, Texas.

Notes for JOHN HAYWOOD BROADWAY:
John Broadway was a Texas Ranger and was living with some Bristers when
Queenie Victoria was born. The story continues that 27 years later John
Broadway married Queenie

6. WILEY FRANK3 BRISTER (WILLIAM2, WILLIAM1, THOMPSONA BRISTOW,
JEDIDIAHB, JOHNC, ROBERT JR.D, ROBERT SR.E) was born 11 May 1838 in
TEXAS, and died 13 April 1913 in Buried in Brister Cemetery. He married
(1) LUCINDA SULLIVAN. He married (2) ANGILINE JORDAN 27 March 1861 in
Atascosa Co. Texas. He married (3) FRANCES NEUMAN 01 June 1871 in
ATASCOSA CO. TX, daughter of ELIAS NEWMAN and SUSAN NOLAN.

Notes for WILEY FRANK BRISTER:
SA - 8632 TX 28, Jul 1905

Marie Brister told me the story, that Seaborn Brister said when his
father came back from Ireland he brought back a baby girl who's name was
Mary. Mary was not suppose to be Wiley's.

Frank and Frankie Neumann met in Natchez when she was hired to care for
the baby Mary, who was Frank's & Lincinda Sullivan. There is a story
of Lucinda's spirit visiting Frankie in Texas. So why did they wait to
be married in Texas?.

Frankie told Richard Shannon's grandmother that Frankie would have never
have married "that old man" if it hadn't been for the baby.

Child of WILEY BRISTER and LUCINDA SULLIVAN is:
i. MARY4 BRISTER, m. RICHARD J. GOLDMAN.

Child of WILEY BRISTER and ANGILINE JORDAN is:
ii. M.A.E.L.4 BRISTER, b. 1864.

Children of WILEY BRISTER and FRANCES NEUMAN are:
iii. KRECIA4 BRISTER, b. Abt. 1872; Stepchild; m. BEN WILLAFORD.
iv. LACY BRISTER, b. Abt. 1872; Stepchild; m. (1) BESSIE BUTLER; m. (2)
LIZZIE WARREN.
v. LIZZIE BRISTER, b. Abt. 1872; Stepchild; m. LON BUTLER.
vi. REATHIE BRISTER, b. Abt. 1872; Stepchild; m. FRED HUNT.
vii. WILEY EUGENE BRISTER, b. 21 June 1872; d. 15 January 1930, Buried
in Brister Cemetery; Stepchild; m. OPHELIA ELIZABETH BUTLER, 05 December
1895, ATASCOSA TX.

Notes for WILEY EUGENE BRISTER:
Wiley was killed in an automobile accident, a drunk driver ran them off
the road into a ditch. His neck was broken, and he died.

viii. JAMES A. BRISTER, b. 18 September 1874; d. 17 September 1910;
Stepchild; m. RUTH I. BUTLER, 19 March 1897, ATASCOSA CO. TX.
ix. MARTHA J. BRISTER, b. 1878; Stepchild; m. JAMES M. CARAWAY, 28
February 1895, ATASCOSA CO. TX.
x. DOSHIA BRISTER, b. 04 March 1883; d. 19 January 1973, Buried in
Brister Cemetery; Stepchild; m. WM LAWSON CLICK, 1914.
xi. FRANK WESTLEY BRISTER, b. 21 April 1884; d. 22 December 1959;
Stepchild; m. SELMA L. JONES.
xii. SEABORN BRISTER, b. 1892; d. 23 February 1988; Stepchild; m. ROSIE BELL.

7. GEORGE WASHINGTON3 BRISTER (WILLIAM2, WILLIAM1, THOMPSONA BRISTOW,
JEDIDIAHB, JOHNC, ROBERT JR.D, ROBERT SR.E) was born 19 August 1839, and
died Unknown. He married ELIZABETH BETTY HUMPHRIES 04 July 1865 in
ATASCOSA TX.

Children of GEORGE BRISTER and ELIZABETH HUMPHRIES are:
i. JOHN ISIAH4 BRISTER, b. 1871, Texas; d. Unknown; m. LOLA MAUD FRASIER.
ii. L.M. ? BRISTER, b. 1873.
iii. LAURA ALICE BRISTER, b. 1875; d. Unknown; m. SAM H. BISHOP, 11
September 1895, ATASCOSA TX.
iv. IDA ELVINO BRISTER, b. 1878; m. DAVID W. EDWARDS, 27 February 1896,
Atascosa Co. Texas.

8. YANCEY GOODALL3 BRISTER (WILLIAM2, WILLIAM1, THOMPSONA BRISTOW,
JEDIDIAHB, JOHNC, ROBERT JR.D, ROBERT SR.E) was born 07 December 1844 in
Texas, and died 07 October 1917 in Buried in Brister Cemetery. He
married MARTHA CORDIELLA BOLGIANO 10 April 1875 in Live Oak Co. Texas,
daughter of FRANCIS BOLGIANO and SUSAN GOYNES.

Notes for YANCEY GOODALL BRISTER:
Name of deceased, Minor or lunatic Date filed Case No.
Brister, Y.G. deceased Dec. 03, 1917 523
This case was a will
In the county of Atascosa Co. Texas on Dec. Term 1917

Now comes Mat C. Brister, widow of Y.G. Brister, deceased, and makes application
for letters of Administration, upon the estate of her deceased husband,
and represents to the court.

1. That Y.G. Brister departed this life, at Pleasanton, Texas, where he
was for medical treatment, on October 7th 1917,and that at the time of
his death and for a long time prior thereto, he had resided on his
property in Atascosa Co., Texas, situated about seven miles north of
Cambellton , Texas.

2. That the most of the property of deceased was in Atascosa Co., and
that the residence of the deceased was in said County at the time of his
death of the deceased.

3. The deceased left no will and owned at the time of his death about
Eighteen Hundred acres of land in Atascosa County, and personal property
in said county, consisting of live stock, cattle, horses and mules, but
most cattle; said personal property of the probable value of $2000.00,
and the real property of the probable value of $18000.00 and all of
the probable value of $20,000; most of which is community property.

4. That the estate owes a small amount of debts, and there is no
available cash to pay off said debts, and there is therefore a necessity
for an administration of said estate.

5. The applicant is the widow of the deceased, and is in no way
disqualified by law to act as administrator of said estate.
Wherefore she prays that citation issue as the law directs
returnable to the next term if this honorable court, and that on a final
hearing she be appointed administratix of said estate, that appraisers
be appointed and for such other and further orders as may be necessary.


Notes for MARTHA CORDIELLA BOLGIANO:
Martha took Iva Bell to raise, because she was her Granddaughter, from
one of her daughter's & Cicero Blankenship.

Children of YANCEY BRISTER and MARTHA BOLGIANO are:
i. ADDIE MAE4 BRISTER, b. July 1877; d. Unknown; m. CICERO BLANKENSHIP,
09 August 1897, Pleasonton Tx Atascosa Co..
ii. MAUD BRISTER, b. October 1879, Texas; d. 01 September 1954, Buried
in Brister Cemetery; m. JOHN W. JENKINS, 28 August 1906, Pleasonton Tx
Atascosa Co..
iii. BABY BRISTER, b. July 1882.
iv. SUSAN PEARL BRISTER, b. July 1882; d. Unknown; m. LEEVE MOORE.
v. MATTIE ELLA BRISTER, b. 07 February 1885, Oakville, Live Oak
Co.,Texas; d. 13 June 1967, Edinburg Texas Buried in Brister Cemetery;
m. (1) THOMAS RANDLE FOREHAND, 20 November 1907, McCoy , Atascosa Co.,
Texas; m. (2) DAVID BERTON WOODLEE, 23 August 1922.
vi. CORA FRANCIS BRISTER, b. 24 November 1887, La Para, Tx (Source:
Broderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 5, Social Security Death
Index: U.S., Date of Import: Dec 31, 1997, Internal Ref.
#1.111.5.28788.62); d. August 1975, Pleasonton, Texas Buried in
Brister Cemetery (Source: Broderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 5,
Social Security Death Index: U.S., Date of Import: Dec 31, 1997,
Internal Ref. #1.111.5.28788.62); m. WILLIAM MEREDITH BRISTER, 09 March
1910, Oakville, Live Oak Co. Texas.

Notes for CORA FRANCIS BRISTER:
[Broderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1 A-L, Ed. 5, Social Security
Death Index: U.S., Date of Import: Dec 31, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.111.5.28788.62]

Individual: Brister, Cora
Social Security #: 463-62-5100
SS# issued in: Texas

Birth date: Nov 24, 1887
Death date: Aug 1975


Residence code: Texas

ZIP Code of last known residence: 78008
Primary location associated with this ZIP Code:

Cambellton, Texas

Grandma Cora played the piano in Rhode


Notes for WILLIAM MEREDITH BRISTER:




vii. WILLIE BRISTER, b. 07 April 1890, Texas; d. 17 April 1890, Texas.,
Buried Brister Cemetery.
viii. DOLLIE CORDELLIA BRISTER, b. 10 July 1891, Texas; d. 24 December
1960, Buried inBrister Cemetery; m. WILLIAM ADOLPH NELSON, 25 December 1932.
ix. MINNIE OLLIE BRISTER, b. May 1894; d. 1946, Texas; m. CROCKET
FERRELL, 19 May 1914, Jourdanton Tx-Atascosa Co..

Notes for CROCKET FERRELL:
Crockett Ferrell was the only son born to the marriage of "Ella" (Sarah
Ellen Bolgiano) and C.B. Ferrell.
However, C.B. "Bine" Ferrell had several children by his first marriage
to Florence Johnson.
Minnie and Crockett were first cousins (Their Mothers were sisters) -
daughters of Susan Goynes,Tindol,
F.A. Bolgiano (Susan divorced Bolgiano and later married James
Dickerson), and F. A. Bolgiano later
married Cora Adelia Hill & had a daughter Louisa Caroline Bolgiano,Clifford.



x. BEN BRISTER, b. July 1897; d. appendicitis age 17 years old.
xi. IVA BELL BRISTER, b. 21 September 1901, Texas; d. 16 February 1974,
Buried in Brister Cemetery; m. JOHN M. HOWARD, Atasco Co. Texas.

9. MARTHA J.3 BRISTER (WILLIAM2, WILLIAM1, THOMPSONA BRISTOW,
JEDIDIAHB, JOHNC, ROBERT JR.D, ROBERT SR.E) was born 1849. She married
(1) JAMES L. MAXWELL. She married (2) BEN E. FREASIER Abt. 1909.

Child of MARTHA BRISTER and JAMES MAXWELL is:
i. INFANT4 MAXWELL, b. 27 November.

Children of MARTHA BRISTER and BEN FREASIER are:
ii. GARNER MCCOON4 FREASIER, b. 14 September 1892; d. 17 March 1989; m.
MARGARET ERMA MCCUMBER, Abt. 1912.
iii. TINDOL FREASIER, b. Unknown; m. SUE STROMAN.
iv. MATTIE FREASIER, b. Unknown; m. IRVINN LUCAS.
v. BEE FREASIER, b. Unknown; m. HATTIE WHITWORTH.
vi. CHARLIE FREASIER, b. Unknown; m. GINNY BROWN.

10. SUSANNAH SMARTIE3 BRISTER (WILLIAM2, WILLIAM1, THOMPSONA BRISTOW,
JEDIDIAHB, JOHNC, ROBERT JR.D, ROBERT SR.E) was born 1852. She married
GEORGE WASHINGTON TINDOL 27 January 1874 in ATASCOSA TX, son of JAMES
TINDOL and SUSAN GOYNES.

Notes for GEORGE WASHINGTON TINDOL:
Susan and George were distant cousins.



Children of SUSANNAH BRISTER and GEORGE TINDOL are:
i. MARY4 TINDOL, b. December 1874; m. JEFF PONDER, 20 December 1905.
ii. WILEY W. TINDOL, b. 17 April 1877, Live Oak Co. Texas; d. 17
January 1880, Buried in Lapara Cem. in Texas.
iii. BABY SISTER TINDOL, b. 31 August 1879; d. Unknown.
iv. YANCEY MONROE TINDOL, b. 13 May 1883; d. 27 February 1957; m.
VURGIE HARDING.
v. TREASIES TINDOL, b. 1885.
vi. BEN FREASIER TINDOL, b. 20 April 1885; d. 26 January 1957,
Gussettvilee Cemetery; m. MARGARET MURPHY.
vii. PANSY TINDOL, b. May 1887; m. WILLIAM BILL MURPHY.
viii. JAMES TINDOL, b. January 1889; d. 1968; m. MAUDE LA FORGE.
ix. CHARLES MAXWELL TINDOL, b. 30 January 1891; d. 13 February 1965; m.
MATTIE WESSON.
x. DAN JASPER "DAN" TINDOL, b. 11 June 1893; d. 15 January 1972; m.
ANNA MAE RAY WESSON.
xi. BUTLER KIMBALL TINDOL, b. 12 February 1896; d. 22 July 1977; m.
FANNY FUGATE.
xii. FRANK TINDOL, b. Abt. 1897.

11. DANIEL "DUDE" FRANKLIN3 BRISTER (DANIEL2, WILLIAM1, THOMPSONA
BRISTOW, JEDIDIAHB, JOHNC, ROBERT JR.D, ROBERT SR.E) was born December
1846 in Texas, and died 1918 in Buried in Brister Cemetery. He married
ELIZABETH "LIZZIE" CATHERINE BRUNER 24 February 1883 in ATASCOSA Co. TX,
daughter of LEWIS BRUNER.

Children of DANIEL BRISTER and ELIZABETH BRUNER are:
i. SUSAN CAROL4 BRISTER, b. 26 January 1884; d. 13 March 1920, Brister
Cemetery; m. RUBEN DIGGS.
ii. WILLIAM MEREDITH BRISTER, b. 06 June 1886, Cambelton Tx; d. 05 May
1955, Buried in Brister Cemetery; m. CORA FRANCIS BRISTER, 09 March
1910, Oakville, Live Oak Co. Texas.

Notes for WILLIAM MEREDITH BRISTER:




Notes for CORA FRANCIS BRISTER:
[Broderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1 A-L, Ed. 5, Social Security
Death Index: U.S., Date of Import: Dec 31, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.111.5.28788.62]

Individual: Brister, Cora
Social Security #: 463-62-5100
SS# issued in: Texas

Birth date: Nov 24, 1887
Death date: Aug 1975


Residence code: Texas

ZIP Code of last known residence: 78008
Primary location associated with this ZIP Code:

Cambellton, Texas

Grandma Cora played the piano in Rhode


iii. ELIZABETH D. BRISTER, b. 19 November 1888; d. 01 March 1964,
Buried in Brister Cemetery Cambelton Tx; m. WALTER THOMAS HURT, 09
May 1906, Pleasonton Tx Atascosa Co..
iv. CARRIE BRISTER, b. 1889.
v. CHARLIE BRISTER, b. September 1893; d. 02 April 1918, Buried in
Brister Cemetery.
vi. DANIEL MALCOME "TED" BRISTER, b. 31 October 1902; d. 20 April 1925,
Buried in Brister Cemetery.

12. SAM E.3 BRISTER (DANIEL2, WILLIAM1, THOMPSONA BRISTOW, JEDIDIAHB,
JOHNC, ROBERT JR.D, ROBERT SR.E) was born 1851 in Texas. He married
W.M.A. ALSUP 10 September 1885 in Burleson Co..

Child of SAM BRISTER and W.M.A. ALSUP is:
i. J.E.4 BRISTER, b. 1888.

13. SUSAN3 GOYNES (MARTHA2 BRISTER, WILLIAM1, THOMPSONA BRISTOW,
JEDIDIAHB, JOHNC, ROBERT JR.D, ROBERT SR.E) was born 02 February 1825 in
Lawrence Co. Mississippi, and died 1925 in Buried in Goynes Cemetery..
She married (1) JAMES A. TINDOL 1839. She married (2) FRANCIS A.
BOLGIANO 1852, son of FRANCIS BOLGIANO and MARY BRISCOE. She married
(3) JOHN S. DICKERSON 1860.

Children of SUSAN GOYNES and JAMES TINDOL are:
i. GEORGE WASHINGTON4 TINDOL, b. 1849; m. SUSANNAH SMARTIE BRISTER, 27
January 1874, ATASCOSA TX.

Notes for GEORGE WASHINGTON TINDOL:
Susan and George were distant cousins.



ii. DICK TINDOL, b. Unknown.
iii. BEN FRANK TINDOL, b. Unknown; d. Unknown, killed by M.L. Peevy.

Children of SUSAN GOYNES and FRANCIS BOLGIANO are:
iv. SARAH ELLEN "ELLA"4 BOLGIANO, b. 1852; d. 1932, Buried in Brister
Cemetery; m. (1) JOHN JENKINS; m. (2) JAMES LARKIN BRISTER, 08 September
1867, Atascosa Co. Texas; m. (3) C.B. BINE FERRELL, 1898.

Notes for C.B. BINE FERRELL:
There was quite a settlement below Oakville known as the "Irish Nation."
There was a settlement on the west side of the Nueces, and after the
flood of 1869, they all moved to Oakville, and it began to settle up.
Tullis and two little girls got hammed up in a tree and had to stay
there all night . Bill Edwards and Bing Ferrell built a boat next day
and got them out.

v. MARTHA CORDIELLA BOLGIANO, b. 26 June 1855, Lousiana; d. 29 July
1938, Buried in Brister Cemetery; m. YANCEY GOODALL BRISTER, 10 April
1875, Live Oak Co. Texas.

Notes for MARTHA CORDIELLA BOLGIANO:
Martha took Iva Bell to raise, because she was her Granddaughter, from
one of her daughter's & Cicero Blankenship.

Notes for YANCEY GOODALL BRISTER:
Name of deceased, Minor or lunatic Date filed Case No.
Brister, Y.G. deceased Dec. 03, 1917 523
This case was a will
In the county of Atascosa Co. Texas on Dec. Term 1917

Now comes Mat C. Brister, widow of Y.G. Brister, deceased, and makes application
for letters of Administration, upon the estate of her deceased husband,
and represents to the court.

1. That Y.G. Brister departed this life, at Pleasanton, Texas, where he
was for medical treatment, on October 7th 1917,and that at the time of
his death and for a long time prior thereto, he had resided on his
property in Atascosa Co., Texas, situated about seven miles north of
Cambellton , Texas.

2. That the most of the property of deceased was in Atascosa Co., and
that the residence of the deceased was in said County at the time of his
death of the deceased.

3. The deceased left no will and owned at the time of his death about
Eighteen Hundred acres of land in Atascosa County, and personal property
in said county, consisting of live stock, cattle, horses and mules, but
most cattle; said personal property of the probable value of $2000.00,
and the real property of the probable value of $18000.00 and all of
the probable value of $20,000; most of which is community property.

4. That the estate owes a small amount of debts, and there is no
available cash to pay off said debts, and there is therefore a necessity
for an administration of said estate.

5. The applicant is the widow of the deceased, and is in no way
disqualified by law to act as administrator of said estate.
Wherefore she prays that citation issue as the law directs
returnable to the next term if this honorable court, and that on a final
hearing she be appointed administratix of said estate, that appraisers
be appointed and for such other and further orders as may be necessary.


Children of SUSAN GOYNES and JOHN DICKERSON are:
vi. PHOEBEANE E. "DOLLIE"4 DICKERSON, m. CHARLES WM MAXWELL.
vii. JAMES J. DICKERSON, b. Unknown; m. RUTH MAXWELL.

14. WILLIAM M BILL3 GOYNES (MARTHA2 BRISTER, WILLIAM1, THOMPSONA
BRISTOW, JEDIDIAHB, JOHNC, ROBERT JR.D, ROBERT SR.E) was born 1829, and
died 15 February 1902. He married MARY A. DOLAN O'RILEY.

Notes for WILLIAM M BILL GOYNES:
William had filed a will in Live Oak Co. William & Daniel Jasper
Brister were accused of murdering M.L. Peavey on 30, June 1869 and were
acquitted on 26 June 1872


Children of WILLIAM GOYNES and MARY O'RILEY are:
i. AUGUSTUS PETER4 GOYNES, b. 1871; d. October 1922, buried Goynes
Cem.; m. DOROTHY DOT GOYNES, January 1899.
ii. SARAH BRIDGET GOYNES, b. 1873; d. 03 September 1896; m. CORNIELUS
BYNUM FERRELL.
iii. MARGARET CECILIA "MAGGIE" GOYNES, b. 1874; m. L. ALEX MCKINNEY.
iv. JAMES IRVIN GOYNES, b. 03 April 1877; d. 12 April 1948; m. LAURA A. JAMES.
v. CHARLES B. GOYNES, b. 08 December 1881; d. 03 January 1882,
Gussettville Cemetery , Live Oak Co., Texas.
vi. WILLIAM W. GOYNES, b. Unknown; d. 12 November 1877.

15. A.S. AUGUSTUS SANDERS3 GOYNES (MARTHA2 BRISTER, WILLIAM1, THOMPSONA
BRISTOW, JEDIDIAHB, JOHNC, ROBERT JR.D, ROBERT SR.E) was born 30 June
1840 in DeKalb, Kemper Co. Mississippi, and died 30 June 1892 in killed
Van Horn El Paso, Texas. He married ELLEN ELIZABETH MCMURRAY 16
February 1874, daughter of WILLIAM MCMURRAY and BRIDGET FOX.

Notes for A.S. AUGUSTUS SANDERS GOYNES:
A.S. had two Land Grants in Live Oak Co. (Ptd. 5061 and Ptd. 368),
located near Oakville, Texas.
He was a stock raiser and farmer

Augustus died by his brother-in-law, Frank McMurray, in a dispute over a
fence and water well. He was the first adult buried in Van Horn Cemetery.

In 1869, as the upshot of what was known as the Goynes & Peevy feud.
Frank Tindol was killed near the Tordillo, Jim Goynes at Cambell's
store the place now known as Cambellton, and Peevey at the old Barlow
Ranch on Weedy.

Children of A.S. GOYNES and ELLEN MCMURRAY are:
i. MARGARET ELLEN4 GOYNES, b. 10 December 1874; d. 18 November 1902,
Gussetville Cemt.; m. JAMES ALFRED GALLAGHER, May 1895.
ii. DOROTHY DOT GOYNES, b. 08 November 1877; d. 24 December 1958,
Hidalgo Co. buried Goynes Cem.; m. AUGUSTUS PETER GOYNES, January 1899.
iii. WILLIAM GOYNES, b. 08 November 1877; d. 12 November 1877.
iv. VIOLA GOYNES, b. 07 May 1879; d. 09 February 1937, Gussettville
Cemetery; m. RICHARD W. BURKS, December 1909.

Notes for VIOLA GOYNES:
Viola Goynes was a school teacher in Live Oak Co. for many years.


v. PETER REAGAN GOYNES, b. 16 April 1881; d. 1941; m. (1) SARA JANE
CHANDLER; m. (2) EVA L. MCCARTHY.
vi. WM EARL GOYNES, b. 09 May 1883; d. 26 November 1952, Gussettville
Cem.; m. (1) ANNA HENDERSON; m. (2) ROSE SEXTON.
vii. DANIEL DAN GOYNES, b. 14 August 1884, Alpine Texas; d. 17 May
1954, Gussettville, Live Oake Cnty, Texas; m. ANNIE MAE LEWIS, 06
October 1919, Gussettvill Live Oak Co. Texas.

Notes for DANIEL DAN GOYNES:
Dan Goynes was a farmer and Merchant in Live Oak Co. He owned the
Goynes Package Store, located 5 miles east of George West, Texas. He
also owned and operated the Gulf Station at Goynes Junction (which was
named for him.] Annie Mae and his daughters Bernice and Nellie and Mae
Helped him by working in the Stores with him. Later on, his son Dan
helped him manage the business.


viii. NELLIE L. GOYNES, b. 06 November 1887; d. 06 May 1909.
ix. NETTIE GOYNES, b. November 1889; d. 02 June 1963; m. THOMAS FRANCES
NANCE, 01 February 1911.
x. JOHN LEE GOYNES, b. 24 June 1891; d. November 1937; m. LORA
MCKINNEY, June 1913.

http://www.hal-pc.org/~jack/gen/newman/Elias_Newman.html